Home » Federal Court Basics: The Structure and Function of Federal and State Courts by The Administrative Office of the United States Courts
Federal Court Basics: The Structure and Function of Federal and State Courts The Administrative Office of the United States Courts

Federal Court Basics: The Structure and Function of Federal and State Courts

The Administrative Office of the United States Courts

Published April 30th 2014
ISBN : 9781499313765
Paperback
78 pages
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 About the Book 

Federal Court Basics - Master the structure and function of federal and state courts. Discover the differences in structure, judicial selection, and cases heard in each system. The U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the land in the UnitedMoreFederal Court Basics - Master the structure and function of federal and state courts. Discover the differences in structure, judicial selection, and cases heard in each system. The U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the land in the United States. It creates a federal system of government in which power is shared between the federal government and the state governments. Due to federalism, both the federal government and each of the state governments have their own court systems. The Judicial Branch has two court systems: federal and state. While each hears certain types of cases, neither is completely independent of the other. The two systems often interact and share the goal of fairly handling legal issues. The U.S. Constitution created a governmental structure known as federalism that calls for the sharing of powers between the national and state governments. The Constitution gives certain powers to the federal government and reserves the rest for the states. The federal court system deals with legal issues expressly or implicitly granted to it by the U.S. Constitution. The state court systems deal with their respective state constitutions and the legal issues that the U.S. Constitution did not give to the federal government or explicitly deny to the states. For example, because the Constitution gives Congress sole authority to make uniform laws concerning bankruptcies, a state court would lack jurisdiction. Likewise, since the Constitution does not give the federal government authority in most family law matters, a federal court would lack jurisdiction in a divorce case.